'West Limerick Families Abroad' 

A study of the Irish who left West Limerick

By Kate Press and Valerie Thompson

With Family trees, emigration logs and stories of their 
triumphs, trials and tribulations in their new homeland.

For more details, see below.

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5bl.jpg (939 bytes) The Deserted  Villages 
5bl.jpg (939 bytes) Name Index to 'West Limerick Families Abroad' by Kate Press & Valerie Thompson
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 Index to Baronies, Parishes, Townlands  covered in 'West Limerick Families Abroad'

5bl.jpg (939 bytes)  A Note from the  Authors
5bl.jpg (939 bytes) Price and Payment
5bl.jpg (939 bytes) Reviews
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Index (only) to 'Poverty to Promise' by Dr Christopher O'Mahoney & Valerie Thompson

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Return to the Shine and Sheehy family of County Limerick

and the Burke and Coffey family of Co Clare.

5bl.jpg (939 bytes) Updated and corrected family information for 'West Limerick Families Abroad'New3.gif (26402 bytes)

        

 

 

'West Limerick Families Abroad' 

Kate Press and Valerie Thompson

5bl.jpg (939 bytes) A study of the Irish who left West Limerick and travelled to the four corners of the globe.  This work sets out their family trees, logs their emigration and contains numerous stories of their triumphs, trials and tribulations in their new homeland.

 

5bl.jpg (939 bytes) More than 1000 family names, with subject cross references. Many name variants are included. There are twenty-seven known variants for the name Prenderville.

 

5bl.jpg (939 bytes) Format: A4, Soft cover, 270 pages 
ISBN 0-646-41334-1
Print run:  1000 copies
 
5bl.jpg (939 bytes) Available from:  Tony Press, 71 Claremont Avenue, Malvern, Victoria 3144, Australia.
 Tel. 03 9509 7115 Intl 61 3 9509 7115

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Price and Method of Payment


5bl.jpg (939 bytes) Australian Price Aus $28.95 PLUS plus postage & packing  $16.00 anywhere in Australia = $44.95.

        (Personal cheques payable to Tony Press or money order accepted, Credit Card not available)

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A Note from the Authors


We can't guarantee that the book will positively identify your family but it covers every aspect of West Limerick and includes

  • An extensive list of genealogies with the contributors and their addresses
  • A brief chronology of Irish History
  • A time-line for Irish Records
  • A list of records for West Limerick including Census Returns and Substitutes; Local Histories; Local Journals; Directories; Gravestone Inscriptions; Graveyard Records and Limerick Newspapers
  • A list of Catholic parishes in West Limerick in the Limerick Diocese with record  commencement dates
  • A list of Civil parishes alphabetically indexed
  • A list of Roman Catholic parishes alphabetically indexed
  • An Enquiry into the Occupation of Land in Ireland
  • A list of "Missing Friends" - extracts from the Boston Pilot
  • An extract from the "Faction Fighters of the Nineteenth Century in West Limerick".
  • West Limerick Convicts
  • A collection of 32 local photographs (old and new)
  • Indexed

 

We hope this helps.

Best Regards,
Kate Press and Val Thompson

 

Absence of Evidence is not Evidence of Absence

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NAME INDEX

Family names include both subjects and cross references. Though most variants are listed space did not permit, for example, 27 known variants for Prenderville. Any belief that your family always spelt their name in a certain way does not envisage the problems faced by a government clerk or shipping agent especially when coping with an unfamiliar Irish accent. So think laterally. If your ancestor is ‘missing* we suggest you drop ‘H* from names beginning with ‘H* but add it to names beginning with a vowel; for names beginning with ‘E * try ‘A*, and try changes with all vowels, for example, ‘oy* or ‘i* for ‘a*. Also, after the English government decided in 1837 in favour of  ‘ee* for the  pronunciation of ‘ea*, they were inconsistent in its use. The Irish kept  Shakepeare*s pronunciation - ‘say* for sea, ‘tay* for tea and so on.

A

Adams 14, 56, 85, 162, 164
Ahearn, Ahern 15, 26, 62, 92, 97, 104, 107, 112, 119, 126, 193
Airey 51
Allan, Allen 15, 28, 85, 156, 210
Alone see O*Lone
Ambrose 17, 163
Archer 27
Armitage/Arnithe 65
Ashbury 186
Atkins 100
Atkinson 84
Aylward see Elwood

B

Bailey see Bayley
Bains 57
Ball 56
Banahan 82
Bannon 41
Barclay 88
Barker 19
Barlam 154
Barratt,Barret(t), Barrett 15-7, 24, 26, 37-8, 99, 129, 156,  180, 184, 190
Barron 161
Barry 17-8, 44, 52, 55-6, 68, 72-3, 139, 141, 169, 175, 195, 213
Barrymore 64
Basser see Besser
Batch 18, 187
Bateson 176
Bath 18
Bayl(e)y 122
Bear 81
Beard 96
Beck 33
Begley 46
Belford 25
Bell 112
Benjamin 77
Bennett 18, 52, 56, 96
Bentley 137
Berriman 32
Berry see also Barry 31
Besser 133
Best 124
Biddle 132
Black 214
Blackall, Blackwell 43, 89, 97
Blake 18
Blakely/Bleakley 209
Boher 138
Boland 45
Boughton 44
Boulger 18, 72
Bourke, Burke 18-22, 87, 92, 100, 110, 116, 121, 132, 159, 164, 166, 194-5, 203, 206, 213
Bourke White see White
Bovenizer 22
Bowman 22
Boyce 155
Boyd(e) 189
Boyle 46
Braddish 122, 177
Bradley 22, 32
Brandon, Brunton 71
Bremner 38
Brenan, Brennan 114,138, 151, 195
Brenner 38
Bresnahan, Brosnahan, Brosnan 46, 49, 93
Brett 94
Brew 18, 72
Brian 93
Brick 208
Bridgewater 210
Bridgeman, Bridgman 85, 121,  123, 177, 210
Brindley 22
Brockway 177
Broderick 194
Brodie 195
Brouder 22
Brown(e) 22, 81, 85, 93
Browning 56
Bryan, Bryant 24, 84, 157(2?), 190
Buckley 22-3, 44, 170, 187
Buckman 68
Bunn 153
Bunworth 114
Burns, Byrne, Byrn(e)s 18, 22-5, 93, 95-6, 108, 116, 127, 129, 143-4,  157-158, 190-1
Butler 36
Byng 121

C

Cahill 26, 164, 169, 177
Callahan see Culhane
Campbell 54, 198, 210
Cantillon 56
Cantwell 81
Canty 25-6, 110-1, 136, 187
Carey 46
Carmody 26, 74, 134, 143, 178, 198, 203
Carney see also Corney, Kearney 98
Carr 73
Carrick 173
Carroll 14-5, 26, 70, 142, 148-9, 202, 208
Carter 26-7
Carthy see also McCarthy 112
Cary 167
Casey, Casy see also Kearsey 19, 27, 76, 82, 118, 159
Cashman 24, 158, 190
Cassidy 18, 80
Cavanagh 92, 193
Challacombe 158
Chaplin 124
Charrel 205
Chisholm 121
Clancy 68, 75, 208
Clare, Lord 44
Clarke 30-2, 99
Cleary 27-9, 90, 208
Clifford 41, 100, 180
Clint 162
Clune 208
Coffee, Coffey 29, 90
Cohey 24
Cole 31, 163-4
Coleman 51, 112
Collins 17, 29, 55, 58, 61, 73, 78, 96, 117-8, 150, 187, 206
Collis 29, 73, 138
Colman 97
Colson 140
Colwell 208
Commins 29-30
Condon 30, 74, 93
Connell see also (O)Connell 30-33, 40, 78, 93, 101, 161, 177, 207
Connelly, Connolly 15, 144
Connor(s) see also O*Connor 34-7, 106, 169-71, 192, 196, 198, 207
Connor(s), Conors 22, 35-37, 48, 53, 69, 121, 136, 142, 149, 177, 199, 202, 207
Connot 212
Conroy 208
Conway 19, 37, 63, 93, 95, 111, 185
Coogan 126
Cooney 121
Copley 50
Copps, Copse 18, 39, 187
Corbett 16-7, 33, 37-8, 68-9, 88, 107, 139, 149, 163, 165, 187
Corgry 141
Corneal /Corneille 38
Corney see also Kearney 43
Cosgrave, Cosgriff, Cosgrove 38-9, 42, 70, 74, 82, 86, 123, 199, 212-213
Costello(e) 39-40, 76, 116, 141, 145-6, 155, 161, 197, 201
Cotter 46, 48
Coughlan, Coughlin 40-1, 44, 108, 208
Courtin see also Curtin 170
Cowell 115
Coy 66
Crattie 143
Creagan/Cregan 40-1, 48, 61, 63, 116, 176
Creagh 28, 138
Crick 203
Crimmins 15, 180
Croak 84
Croker 56
Crosley 19
Crowe 41-2
Crowley 38, 42, 83
Cuddie 126
Culhane 19, 42-4, 50, 67, 76, 90, 98, 101, 104, 108, 115-6, 125, 133, 146, 149, 164, 176, 178-9, 180
Cullen 44, 79
Cullinane see Culhane
Cummane, Cumming, Cummins 29-30, 84, 200-1
Cuninghame, 54, 69, 86, 150, 174, 204
Curran 45
Curry 214
Curtain, Curtin 45, 45-9, 126, 168
Cusack 150
Cussen, Cussan, Cushion,Cushen 66, 116, 204

D

Dalton 50, 74, 87, 101, 123, 136, 146, 198, 213
Daly 76, 143, 168
Danagher, Danaher, Donaher 18, 20, 38, 40, 50-5, 63-4, 73, 89,  92, 106, 129, 164, 177, 189, 193, 207, 214
Dargan 45
Dartnell 91, 192
Daugherty 126
Davidson 203
Davin 170
Davis 31, 44, 88, 153, 214
Dawson 100
De Berg 120
de Vere Hunt 24, 56
Delahey 165
Delahunty 55
Delane, Delhane see Dillane 102, 135
Delaney 211
Delmage, Delmege, Dolmage 38, 145, 186, 216
Dempsey 24, 31, 35, 55, 112, 169
Denahy, Deniher 55, 80
Devine 40, 55, 154
Dight 36
Dignum 167
Dillane see also Dillon 135
Dillon 44, 55-7, 72, 206
Dimond 57
Dobbins 57-8
Dochard 141
Dodd 81, 114, 165
Doe 107
Doer, Dower see Dore
Doherty 93, 143
Dohig see Dohig
Dolmage see Delmege
Donaher see Danaher
Donahue, Donoghue 58, 60, 159, 178
Dondon see Dundon 58
Donnelly 137
Donovan 93, 134
Doody 48
Doohy 112
Doolan 29, 73, 112, 138
Dooley 60-1
Doran 142
Dore, O*Dower 15, 58, 61-3, 131, 191
Dowling 80, 186
Down(es) 49, 55, 75
Downey, Downing 40, 63-4, 79, 124, 162, 181, 196, 210
Doyle 44, 115, 176
Drew 64
Drury 57, 210
Duck 17
Duffin 207
Duggan, Duigan 64, 155
Duhig, Dohig 58, 75
Dundon 58, 86, 103
Dunn(e) 16, 27, 33, 64, 191
Duval 78
Dwyer 108, 121, 142

E

Ebsarry  see Ebzery
Ebzery 37, 55, 64-6, 142
Edgar 131
Edwards 153
Egan 36, 60, 67, 86, 88, 101-2, 102, 109, 116, 123, 134, 143, 147, 164, 182, 201, 206, 212
Elliott 67-8, 108
Ellis 23
Elrington 30
Elwood 210
Embury 185
Emery 68
En(w)right, Enraght 38, 42, 55, 68-72, 82, 87, 90, 119, 123, 125-6, 128, 141, 149-50, 163, 170, 177-8, 189, 213
Evans 164, 186
Ewens, Ewins 194

F

Fagan 34
Fahey 116
Faithfull 19
Fallon 133
Falvey 48, 94, 111
Farrell 31, 38, 72, 96, 114, 129-30, 137, 198, 212
Farrelly 65
Fawcett 18, 72
Fealy 126, 168
Fee see also Fahey 49
Fennell 72-3
Ferguson 98
Finucane 17, 55, 73
Fitzgerald 19, 26, 29, 38-9, 43-44, 50-1, 73-82, 87-8, 102, 113, 121, 129, 133, 135, 137, 145-6, 152, 168, 171, 213
Fitzgibbon(s) 20, 38, 42, 62, 70, 82-3, 131, 182, 190, 199, 202, 204
Fitzmaurice 26, 83
Fitzpatrick 24, 84
Fitzsimmons, Fitzsimons 84, 156
Flahavin, Flavin, Flahive 25, 85, 95-6, 150
Flaherty 80
Flanagan, Flanigan 85, 86, 126-7, 161
Flannery 188
Fleming 86, 97, 135
Flinn see also Flynn 37
Flint 205
Flood 22
Flynn 43, 49, 113, 124, 209
Foley 30, 84, 160, 177, 184
Forein, Forehan, Foren 101, 114, 133
Forster 113
Fosbery 56
Fowke 164
Fowler 27
Fox 86, 208
Franklyn 191
Frawley 50, 75, 86-7, 117, 123, 148, 212-3
Frew 36
Fulton 113, 135
Furlong 205
Furnell 188

G

Gabett 56
Gahan 103
Gain 60
Gallagher 87-8
Galvin 88
Garvan, Gavan 88, 92, 106, 141
Garvin see also Garvan 51, 88-9, 129, 141, 214
Gaynor 89, 128, 200, 202
Gearin, Gearon see also Guerin 89-90, 125
Geary see also Gearin 89
Geoghegan 119
Gibbes 153
Gibbons 24
Gibney 198
Gibson 32, 114
Gidsley 87, 213
Gilborn 58
Gilchrist 104
Gilleany 152
Gillespie 78
Gilmore 189
Giltenane 90
Ginnane see Guinane
Glane/Glover 33
Gleeson, Glissan, Glisson 27, 86, 90, 141
Glisson, see Gleeson
Glynn 152
Godfrey 44, 90-1, 171
Goodal 103
Goodridge 129
Goodwin 33-4, 54, 91-2, 166, 171, 192, 196, 215
Gordon 19, 65, 189, 195
Gorman 16, 88, 92, 134, 137, 146
Gosewinckel 120
Gould 56
Grace 201
Grady, (O)*Grady 93, 172, 209
Grainey see Greaney
Grealey 71
Greaney, Grainey 194
Greatrakes/Greatorex 91, 196
Green(e) 56, 93, 97
Greevy 173
Griffen, Griffin see also 25, 30-1, 37, 67, 70, 73, 80, 88, 91, 93, 95-96, 104, 111, 113, 116, 119, 130, 144, 212
Griffith(s) see also Griffin, 54, 185, 209
Grimwood 150
Grogan 163
Guare, Guere, Guire, Geary 89, 96, 99, 146
Guerin, Geering see also Gearin 42, 57, 89, 97-8, 125
Guest 172
Guinae, Guinea, Guiney 63, 73, 98-9
Guinane, Ginnane 74, 98, 108, 128, 171-2, 197
Gyles 206, 215

H

Hagerty 85
Haines 209
Hall 157
Hallam 77
Halligan 100
Hallihan, Hallinan(e) 197, 212
Halloran, also see O*Halloran 58, 102, 115, 121, 179, 183
Halpin 37, 99, 105
Ham 54
Hamett 99
Hamilton 26, 73
Hammond 159
Hancock 110, 183
Hand 88
Handley 51, 171
Hanigan 78
Hanley 99, 125, 135
Hannan 41, 45,  88
Hannigan 168, 190
Hanrahan 51, 110, 158, 204, 212
Harding 77
Hardwood see Howard
Harnett 48, 49, 99, 159, 168-9
Harper 175
Harrington 169
Harrold 135
Hart 24, 114, 208
Hartigan 114
Hartley 190
Hartnett 17, 48, 51, 62-3, 89, 100, 114, 159, 168, 214
Hartney 77, 202
Harvey 128
Hassell see also Hassett 174
Hasset(t) 69, 107, 130, 150, 174, 179, 182, 196
Hastings see also Histon 65, 74, 101, 196
Haugh see Hough
Hawdon 19
Hawkes 139
Hayes 33, 50, 55, 76, 82, 88, 101-3, 118, 121-122, 126, 144, 146, 150, 165, 172, 177-8, 180, 208
Headley 115
Heally/Healy 24, 71, 73, 78, 80, 86, 88-89, 103-105, 126, 143, 171, 191, 194, 196
Heck 185
Hedges 105
Hehir, O*Hehir 105, 118
Hennessy 62, 105
Henning 105
Hensleigh 99
Hewson 189, 191, 208
Hickey 125
Hicks 34
Hickman 138
Higgins 143
Hishon, Hishion, Hishing 35, 42, 55, 103, 106, 170
Histon 55, 88, 101, 106
Hitchen(s) 96-7
Hobbs 212
Hoch see Hough
Hogan 15, 37, 74, 90, 107, 112, 128
Hollins 99
Hollis 16
Holmes 46
Holohan 92, 194
Holoran 37
Hooke 147
Hoolahan, Houlahan, Houlihan 34, 93, 107
Hooley 107, 139
Horan 126
Horrigan/ Hourigan 38, 83
Hough, Hawkes, Hoch, Howe 62, 67, 107, 111, 116, 139, 204
Hovell 84
Howard 85, 168, 194, 198
Howell 91, 193
Hudson 43
Hughes and Hosking 142
Hume 84, 198
Hungerford 112
Hunt 50, 56, 189
Hurley 18, 20, 32, 40-1, 43-4, 67, 72, 98, 107-10, 125, 147, 154, 161, 171-2, 182,  184, 196, 212
Hutchins 110, 187
Hutchinson 155
Hyndes see also Hynes 110
Hynes 25, 95, 110, 111, 120, 183, 187

I

Inch 186
Ingoldsby 138
Irwin 111-2, 139
Ives 39

J

Jack 165
Jackson 27-8
James 19, 43
Jess 112, 127
Johnson,Johnstone 68, 96
Jones 118
Jordan 205
Joy  see also Joyce 88, 112
Joyce 57, 112-3, 141, 180
Joynt 113, 131, 191
Judd 24
Julian 92, 196
Justice 138

K

K(e)arney 57
Kaine see also King 157
Kane, Kean(e) 32, 85, 168
Kearney see also Corney 57, 170
Kearsey see also Casey 119
Keating 98, 113, 133, 168, 208
Keefe 49, 112
Kehoe see Keogh
Keily 134
Keleny see Gilleany
Kellett 28, 90
Kells 119
Kell(e)y 18, 20-1, 24, 42, 67, 84-5, 87, 92-3, 99, 101, 113-9, 130, 133, 136-7, 161, 176-7, 193-6, 202, 212-3
Kelsey 119
Kemp 119, 165
Kempster 177
Kenneally, Kennelly, Kinnaley 26, 50, 63, 74, 86,
120-4, 129, 137, 150, 170, 177, 179-80, 211, 213
Kennedy 19, 23-4, 26, 40, 76, 101, 108, 120, 161-3, 182, 194
Kennelly see Kenneally
Kenny 42, 96, 105, 118-9, 124
Kenster 79
Kent 124
Keogh 20, 95, 114
Kerr 124
Kerrigan 80
Kerwin 87, 213
Kevin 56
Keyte 46
Kiel(e)y 169, 204
Kiley 131
Killeen 169
Killmartin, Kilmartin 124, 212
Kinchington 36
Kinealy see Kenneally
King 23, 26, 30, 55, 124, 157, 193
Kinnaley, Kinneally see Kenneally
Kinnane 179
Kirby 158
Kirk(s) 27, 132
Kissane 46
Knopwood 161
Knowles 120
Kroll(?) 169

L

Lalor 33, 149
Landers, Launders 42, 125
Lane 21, 117, 125, 147, 170
Langan see O*Longain
Langford 140
Langton 209
Lannigan 28
Larkin 63
Larn see Lane
Launders 125
Lavery 125
Lawlee 52, 91-2
Leader 22
Leahy 23, 24, 45, 47, 48, 55, 61, 125-6, 147, 161, 168, 206
Leary 145
Lee 64
Lehane, Leheny 22, 60, 126, 170, 180
Lemon 86, 105, 126
Lenihan, Linihan 125-6, 168
Lennox 98, 137
Leslie 70
Lhuede 133
Lindsay 126
Liston 68, 112, 116, 126-8
Lloyd 26
Loftus 85
Lorigan 66
Lovat 37
Love 67, 116
Lowe 18
Lydamore 66
Lyddy 48
Lynch 38, 127-8, 143, 147, 179, 203
Lyons 17, 23, 119, 128
Lysa(u)ght 68, 134, 198

M

MacHenry, MacInery 58, 157
MacInnes 190
Mack 208
Mackay 108, 112
Mackeness see Macinnes 190
Mackey 112
MacNamara 52
Madden 84, 131, 154
Madigan 17, 22, 35, 40, 43, 74-5, 82, 113-5, 128-33 137, 174, 176, 179, 191, 198, 202, 208, 212
Magennis 92, 196
Maguire 14
Maher 70
Mahon 113, 172
Mahon(e)y 35, 46, 51, 83, 111, 134,138, 170
Malone 188, 191
Maloney 49, 99, 114, 162, 170
Maney see Meaney
Mangan 20, 74, 93, 116, 132, 134-5, 197-8, 211
Manion see Mangan
Manning also see Mangan 135, 210
Mara see O*Mara
Maren 89, 214
Marina 115
Markham 135, 191, 205
Maroney 25, 50, 135-6
Marr 174
Martin 114, 123, 136-7, 211
Mason see also Mahon 172
Massy 137-8
Matthews 98, 108, 172
Maunsell 91, 192
Mayoh 119
McAlister, McAllister 29, 138-9, 191
McArthur 38
McAuliffe 46
McCarthy, McCarty 19, 48, 53, 58, 64, 69, 107, 111, 120, 139-41, 150, 171, 192
McCluskey 63
McCollicott 91
McCollum 85
McCormick 64, 89, 141, 212, 214
McCoy 51, 75, 133, 141
McCue 141
McDonagh 115
McDonald 69, 190
McDonnell 87, 136, 141-2, 164, 213
McElhide, see McElhill
McElhill 165
McElligott 22, 142, 170
McGillivray 39
McGlade 70
McGoldrick 188
McGovern 204
McGrath 135, 142, 162
McHenry 135
McInerney see also McKerney 57, 199, 204
McIney 47
McIntyre 165, 186
McKeever 142
McKernan 142
McKerney see also McInerney 103
McMahon, Mcmason 18, 20, 30, 34, 68, 81, 96, 114, 121, 136, 142-4, 162, 177, 187, 194, 212
McNall 21
McNamara 28, 37,  122, 128, 144-5, 181, 197
McNerny 145
McNulty 24
McQueen 208
McQuillan 144
Meade 104, 105, 145
Meaney 25
Meehan 145, 208
Mellett/Millett 125
Mellon 58
Mellows 150
Melvahille, Melville see Mulvihill
Merrett 111
Merrifield 175
Metcalfe 171
Millay 60
Miller 145-6, 170, 216
Mills 72
Milson 162
Minaghan 174
Minogue 131
Mitchell 35, 138
Mitzzer 26
Moffat 125
Molahon 48
Molon(e)y 73, 90-91, 101, 128, 146
Monaghan, Monahan 32, 34
Monteagle 14, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30, 35, 37, 53, 55, 61, 64, 67, 69, 73, 85-6, 88, 97, 101, 103-4
Moore 44, 80, 88, 146
Moran 38, 70, 214
Morgan 98, 146, 179
Morony see also Maroney 146
Morris 28
Mosman 37
Mounson 166
Moxham 20
Mulcah(e)y 15, 34, 43, 126
Mulcair 102, 146-7
Mulcare 15, 67, 106, 109, 117, 147-9, 182, 184, 196, 215
Mulcrea see Mulcare
Mulhorin 54
Mullane 110, 112, 127, 201
Mullice 64
Mullins 33, 56, 85, 149
Mulqueen 189, 216
Mulvihill, Melville 69, 85, 99, 118, 149-50, 214
Mungovan 101
Murnane 177
Murphy 30, 36, 38, 48, 61, 69, 86, 139, 141, 150-2, 177, 188, 192
Murray 26, 45, 100, 108, 137, 152-4
Mylecharane 115

N

Napier 67
Narmile see Normyle
Nash 18, 93, 154-5, 212
Naughton 25, 44, 111, 136, 155, 169
Naylon, see Nealon
Neale 189
Nealon 98, 101, 200, 202
Nestor 155, 199, 204
Nevil(le) 21, 24, 26, 74, 88, 114, 118, 123, 130, 141, 156-60, 173-4, 190-3, 201
Newland see also Nolan 186
Newman see also Nunan 44, 212
Nix 22, 56
No(w)lan 30-1, 160-1, 202-4
Noonan see also Nunan 74, 120
Normyle, Normoyle 149, 161
Nugent 40, 125, 161-2
Nunan 121

O

O*Brien 15, 20-21, 29, 35, 46, 60, 67, 79, 101-2, 111, 116, 119, 125, 142, 152, 161-167, 169, 171, 177-8, 185, 187-8, 190, 199, 206, 215
O*Callaghan 84
O*Collins 78, 168
O*Connell 30, 44, 52, 70, 104, 126, 163, 168-169, 201
O*Connor see also Connor 22, 28, 48, 55, 61, 71, 79, 100, 103, 123, 128, 140, 145, 166, 169-71, 173, 177, 196, 201
O*Dell 171
O*Donelly 68
O*Donnell(e) 79, 89, 91, 118, 119, 123, 133, 156, 171, 189, 206
O*Donohue 126
O*Dower 61
O*Flynn 31
O*Gorman 48
O*Grady 49, 156, 171-2, 191, 209
O*Halloran 26, 95, 110, 183
O*Keefe, O*Keeffe 40, 46, 48, 90, 161, 168, 172, 200
O*Keeffe 43, 53, 92, 98, 108, 193, 197
O*Kelly 204
O*Leary 178
O*Lone 127
O*Longain, Langan 125
O*Mahoney 46
O*Malley 127
O*Mara 75, 77, 144, 181
O*Neil(l), O*Neil Brenan, 42, 48, 106, 108, 111, 150, 172-3, 177, 182, 189, 209, 211
O*Reilly 79, 98, 143
O*Rourke 98
O*Shannassy, O*Shannessy,
O*Shaughnessy 19, 30-1, 43-4, 75, 95, 102, 131, 161-71, 173, 190-1
O*Shea see also Shea 43, 174, 191, 204
O*Sullivan see also Sullivan 47-8, 55, 76, 77, 96, 121, 162, 164
O*Donnell 89
Oneham see also Houlahan 34
Orton 163
Osborne 161
Oxford 175

P

Page 40
Pawley 161, 187
Pearce, Pearse see also Pierce 32
Pearson 142
Pennington 161
Peppard 64
Perkins 163
Perry 47
Peters 174
Pettie, Petty 177
Pettitt 81
Pickley 151
Pierce, Pierse see also Pearce 177, 199
Pilkington 22, 165
Piper 64, 174
Plunkett 210
Polding 100
Polin 45
Pollack 200
Poole 186
Powell 17, 114, 160
Power(s) 17, 44, 130, 144, 149, 160, 188, 192, 207-8, 213
Pratt 21
Prendergast 96
Prendiville, Prineville 174
Press 14
Preston 138
Purcell 175, 185
Purtell, Purtill 26, 51, 74, 76, 121, 124, 176-9

Q

Quaid 41, 51, 117
Quillan see Culhane 179
Quilter 182
Quilty 14, 50, 63, 101, 121, 144, 172, 179-82
Quinlan 124, 195, 202
Quin(n) 17, 129, 152
Quirk(s) 78, 84, 168

R

Rahilly see also Reilly 49
Raleigh 25, 67, 107, 111, 147-8, 182-4
Ready, Reddy 14, 142, 147, 162, 184
Reedy, Reidy 46, 120, 147, 184-5, 213
Reardon see Riardon
Reddall 38
Reddan 16
Reech see Reedy
Rees 149
Reilly see also Rahilly 42
Revell 165
Richards 134
Richardson 44
Rigg 103, 122
Riley 161
Riordan, Reardon 49, 54, 113, 118, 144, 185, 207
Roach, Roche 47, 50, 52, 131, 171, 175, 180, 185
Rochford 124, 189
Roogall see Ruckel
Ross 174
Rowan, Rowen, Rohan 53, 131
Ruckel, Ruddle, Ruttle 27, 147, 185-7
Russell 17, 22, 177
Ryan 20, 24, 29, 43, 56, 64, 75, 86-9, 96, 99, 108, 120, 131, 142, 156-7, 165, 172, 187, 209

S

Salmon 122
Sarsfield 82
Scanlan, Scanlon 18-9, 25, 47, 80, 85, 102, 110, 164, 168, 184, 187
Scannell 187
Schmidt 111
Schoemaker/Shoemaker 205
Scollard 188
Sexton 107
Shanahan, Shannahan 15, 24, 50, 80, 111, 158, 189-90
Shane see Sheahan 197
Shannass(e)y see also Shaughnessy 113
Shannock, Shennick 84
Sharky 101
Sharry 150
Shaughnessy 27, 64, 67, 99, 114, 118, 135, 155-6, 190-1, 199
see also Shannassy/OShaughnessy
Shea see also O*Shea 43, 174, 188-92, 208
Sheady, see Sheedy
Sheahan, Shane, Shean, also 20, 23, 25, 30, 35, 54,see Sheehan 60, 67, 81, 86, 91-3, 95, 105-7, 110, 114, 116, 125-126, 132, 146-8, 157,195
Sheedy 21, 23, 94, 197
Sheehan also see Sheahan 18, 41, 101, 128, 143, 197-8, 208, 212
Sheehy 23, 26, 35, 51, 121, 130, 133-4, 155, 160, 169, 177, 198-204
Sheen see Sheahan
Sheil(s) 62,  167
Shelly 143
Sherlock 82
Shier, Shire 38, 149, 205, 208-12
Shine 199, 200, 202, 204
Sigmont 107
Silcox 77
Simmons see Fitzsimmons
Slattery 102, 135, 205
Smith, Smyth 15, 62, 65, 110, 126, 128, 142, 162, 174, 205-6, 215
Somerville 174
Sora(g)han, Soreghan 21, 164
Southwell 145, 209
Sparling 22, 38
Spiers 61
Stack 49, 55, 142, 201, 206
Stackpoole 78, 168
Stapleton 158
Starr 138
Stephen 178
Stewart 137, 215
Stinson 206, 212
Stokes 178
Street 82
Studdert 138
Sullivan 55, 72, 96, 98, 123, 135, 144, 149,
152, 161, 171, 177, 184, 191, 206-8, 210
Summers 208
Sutor 198
Swallow 207
Sweeney 47

Switzer 38, 64, 145, 172, 208-9

T

Teskey 119, 211
Therry 37-8, 108, 157
Thomas 119
Thom(p)son 74, 151, 174
Thorp 56
Tierney 51, 87, 112, 114, 123, 134, 137, 211, 213
Tigue 167
Timmins 89
Timms 155
Toner 95
Toohill 115, 212
Toomey 18, 198
Torrens 122
Trainor/Traynor 54
Trants 52
Tregoning 17
Tully 170
Turidin 25
Turner 212
Tyrell 21

V

Vandeleur 122
Vardy 107
Vere Hunt see also de Vere Hunt 56

W

Walker  112, 204
Wall  92, 146, 193, 208, 212
Wallace 20, 120
Walsh(e) 35, 37-8, 44, 51, 67, 69-70, 81-2, 86, 88-9, 91, 104, 117, 120, 141, 157, 178, 180, 203, 206, 212, 216
Walters 197
Ward 144
Warre 120
Warton 163
Watson 138
Watts 186
Webster 121
Weeks 103
Welch see Walsh
Well 93
Welsh see Walsh
Wesley 185
West 62
White 25, 37, 75, 83
Wholohan see Houlahan, Oneham
Wilkinson 143
Williams 61, 175
Wilson 141, 178, 190
Wiltshire 86
Windle 122, 216
Wingle 80, 216
Winter(s) 135, 216
Wiseman 26, 74
Witty 95
Wo(o)lfe see Woulfe
Woods 153
Woulfe 45, 48, 52, 55-6, 75, 208
Wright 81, 214
Wyndham 111
 

 

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Baronies, Parishes, Post Towns and Townlands

 

We have used Rathkeale as the eastern boundary of our research. It was, historically, the capital of West Limerick - even before the division of County Kerry was marked n the map. Rathkeale is only used as rough marker- we had to be flexible. If someone lived 5 miles east of Rahkeale then they would be also included in our work.

The parishes/baronies covered include:

BARONY OF LOWER CONNELLO

Comprising a Portion of the Unions of Croom, Glin and Rathkeale 1852

PARISH TOWNLAND
ASKEATON
Aghalacka
TOWN OF ASKEATON (PART)
    " " " Brewery Lane (S side)
Askeaton
TOWN OF ASKEATON (PART)
    " " " Barrack Lane
    " " " Church Lane
    " " " The Square
    " " " The Quay
Ballyengland Lower
Balyengland Upper
Ballyhomin
Ballynacaheragh
Ballynagh
Ballynort
Ballyvaddoch
Baunreagh
Cloonreask
TOWN OF ASKEATON (PART)
    " " " Brewery Lane (N. side)
    " " " Main Street
    " " " Muscle Lane
    " " " William Street
Coolrahnee
TOWN OF ASKEATON (PART)
Courtbrown
Cragmore
Galway
Moig North
Moig South
Shannonview
Tideway of River Deel

CAPPAGH
Ballinvira
Cappagh
Cloonoul
Deanstown
Graigue
Knockdromin

CLONAGH
Ballinvulla
Ballyegnybeg
Ballyegnymore
Ballykenry
Ballynamullagh
Ballynisky
Clonagh
Coolcappagh
Deelish
Gortroe
Kilquane
Lisnacullia
Lissatotan
Rathgoonan
Rathreabeg
Rathreamo e
CLONSHIRE
Boherbraddagh
Clonshirebeg
Clonshiremore
Coolballyshane
Garraunboy
Gortnagrour
Graigue
Knockdromin
CROAGH
Adamswood
Amoganbeg
Amoganmore
Ardnaprenyhaun
Ballinvira
Ballycannon
Ballyea
Ballylin
Ballymacave
Ballynagoul
Ballynaguila
Clogh East
Clogh West
Croagh
Croagh Commons
Fihidy
Gortreagh
Killea
Kiltenan North
Kiltenan South
Lisnamuck
Miltown
Newpark
Oldcourt
Raheen
DUNDONNELL
Ardnaveagh
Cloghanarold
Kilcool
Riddlestown
RATHBRODRAN
Ballinvulla
Dromturk
KILSCONNELL
Ballinliny
Ballyrobin
Collanoran
Coolybrown
Killeheen
Kilscannell
Reens East
Reens West
Skehanagh
LISMAKEERY
Altavilla
Ballyclogh
Ballycullen
Ballyellinan
Conigar
Creeves
Liffane
Lismakeery
Milltown North
Milltown South
MORGAN S
Morgan s North
Morgan s South
Islands in R. Shannon
Tideway of R. Shannon
NANTINAN
Altavilla
Ardgoulbeg
Ardgoul North
Ardgoul South
Ardtomin
Ballingarrane
Ballintredida
Ballinvirick
Ballyadam
Ballybaun
Ballyhibbin
Ballyhomock
Ballymorrisheen
Ballybockoge
Boolaglass
Bullaun
Callow
Curraheen North
Curraheen South
Curraghnadeely
Derry
Doohylebeg
Doohylemore
Enniscoush
Feeagh
Gorteennamrock
Gaigeen
Graigues
Kilbehy
Loughaun
Lurraga
Nantinan
Rathnaseer
Scart
Stoneville
RATHKEALE
Abbeylands
IN TOWN OF RATHKEALE (PART)
Ardbohil
Ardnanean
Ballyallinan North
Ballyallinan South
Ballybrown
Ballyea
Ballycawood
Ballywilliam Demesne
Ballywilliam North
Ballywilliam South
Ballywinterrourke
Ballywinterrourkewood
Bealdurroga
Beechmount Demesne
Blossomhill
Boherwee
TOWN OF RATHKEALE (PART)
Castlematrix
Cloghabrida
Courtmatrix
Doonbeirne
Dromand Demesne
Duckstown
English Tenements
TOWN OF RATHKEALE (PART)
    " " " Main Street (pt.)
    " " " Well Lane
Enniscouch
TOWN OF RATHKEALE (PART)
    " " " Church Street
Graigue
Islandboy
Kilcolman East
Kilcolman West
Knockaunavad
Kyletown
Loghill
Moanwing
Parklewis
Ranahan
TOWN OF RATHKEALE (PART OF)
    " " " Borheen
    " " " Fair Green Hill
    " " " Lane off Well Lane communicating with the Square
    " " " Lane (rear of Main Street and Square)
    " " " Main Street (pt.)
    " " " New Road
    " " " Office off Pound Lane
    " " " Old Chapel Lane
    " " " Peppard s Lane
    " " " Pound Lane
    " " " Roches Road
    " " " The Square
    " " " Thomas Street
    " " " Well Lane
Rathkeale Commons
Rylanes
Stoneville
Wolfesburgess East
Wolfesburgess West
TOMDEELY
Cloonreask
Islands in R. Shannon
Tomdeely North
Tomdeely South
Tideway of R. Deel
Tideway of R. Shannon

BARONY OF SHANID

Comprising a portion of the Unions of Glin, Newcastle and Rathkeale, 1852
 
PARISH TOWNLAND
ARDAGH
Ardagh
VILLAGE OF ARDAGH (PART OF)
Ardvone
Ballinloughane
Ballyine
Ballynabearna
Ballynacally
Carrigkerry
Commons
Coolacokery
Coolcronoge
Cross
Crusheenkeenoge
Dromrahnee
Enaghgare
Farrantlaba
Killard
Killreash
Kilrodane
Knocknaboha
Liskalleen (Dickson)
Liskalleen (O Brien)
Minister s Land
VILLAGE OF ARDAGH (PART)
Monnashinnagh
Reerasta N
VILLAGE OF ARDAGH (PART)
Reerasta S
Rooskagh E
Rooskhagh W
DUNMOYLAN
Ballinloughane
Bauraneag
Cahernagh
Creeves
Dooncaha
Dunmoylan
Gortadroma
Knockfinnisk
Lisbane
Moneymohill
Moyreen
Park
KILBRADRAN
Ardlaman
Ballyan
Ballylin
Ballyneety
Ballysteen
Cooltomin
Graigoor
Kilbradran
Lissatotan
Rathnagore
KILCOLMAN
Ballydoorlis
Boughhilbo
Carrons
Glensharrold
Grouselodge
Kilcolman
Knockbweeheen
KILFERFUS
Ballyculhane L
Ballyculhane U
Ballydonohoe
Ballygiltenan L
Ballygiltenan N
TOWN OF GLIN (PARTOF)
    " " " Harnilton Terrace
    " " " Main Street
    " " " Chapel Street
    " " " Lane off S. Main Street
    " " " Old Mall
    " " " Gallerys Mall
    " " " New Mall
    " " " South Main Street
Ballygiltenan U
Ballygoghlan
Ballynagaul
Ballynamuddagh
Caheragh
Cloonoughter
Court
Dromeask
Farranmiller
Fleanbeg
Fleanmore
Glenagragara
Glin Demesne
Killacolla
Killacolla (Barker)
TOWN OF GL1N (PART OF)
    " " " S. Main Street
    " " " Lane off S. Main Street
    " " " Main Street
    " " " Creagh St
    " " " Houses in rear of Main Street
    " " " Limerick Rd
    " " " Mary Street
    " " " Castle Street
    " " " Mill Street
Killeanybeg
Killeanymore
Kinard
Tooraree L
Tooraree U
Tullyglass
Tullyleague
KILMOYLAN
Ballinknockane
Ballyane
Ballyhahill
VILLAGE OF BALLYHAHILL
Ballylin
Briskagh
Carrowbreedoge
Carrowclog
Clashganniff
Cloonlahard E
Cloonlahard W
Cloonty
Cloonyclohassy
Craggard
Craggs
Deelish
Dromagarraun
Dunmoylan
Finnoo
Glashapullagh
Glenbaun
Kilcosgrave
Kilmoylan
Knockaclugga
Knockdown
Knocknagornagh
Mohernagh
Moig
Mulderricksfield
Mullagh
Shanid L
Shanid U
Tinnakilla
Tooreendonnell
Tubbrid
LOGHILL
Ballyhoolahan
Ballyrae
Carrowbane Beg
VILLAGE OF LOGHILL
Carrowbane More
Currabeg
Curramore
Kilfergus
Kilteery
Knocknabooly E
Knocknabooly Middle
Knocknabooly W
Lisready (Clare)
Lisready (Cripps)
Loghill
Mounttrenchard
NANTINAN
Derreen
NEWCASTLE
Gortnaglogh
Kilrodane
RATHRONAN
Athea L
Athea U
VILLAGE ATHEA (PART)
Ballyegny
Ballykealy
Ballylin
Ballymakeery
Ballyvoghan
Cahermoyle
Clash N
Clash S
Cool E
Cool W
Crataloe E
Crataloe W
Dromada
Glenagower
Glendiheen
Glenssharrold
Glenville
Gortnagross
VILLAGE ATHEA (PART)
Keale
Kerrikyle
Knockaunnagan
Lisgordan
Templeathea E
Templeathea W
VILLAGE OF ATHEA (PART)
Tooradoo
ROBERTSTOWN
Ballynacragga N
Ballynacragga S
Corgrig
Craggs
Croaghane
Doonskerdeen
Durnish
Dysert
Ellaha
Fawnamore
Hazelfield
Inchagreenoge
Islands No 1 { Auginish E
                     { Auginish W
No 2 Foynes Island
No 3 17 inclusive Islands
Kimeheer
Knockardnacorlan
Knockpatrick
Leahys
Monavaha
Mulderricksfield
Oldabbey
Oorla
Parkmore
Rincullia
Robertstown
Shanagolden Demesne
Stroolane N
Stroolane S
Stokesfield
Tideway River Shannon
SHANAGOLDEN
Ardaneer
Ballinree
Ballycormick
VILLAGE OF SHANAGOLDEN (PART)   
    " " " South Main St
    " " " Kerry Road
Ballynacragga
Ballynash (Bishop)
Ballynash (Clare
Churchfield
Clashganniff
Cloonty
Corbally
Croaghane
Glenbane E
Glenbane W
Island in Robertstown River
Kilcosgrave
Monavaha
Mountdavid
Parkmore
Rathfarra
Shanagolden
SHANAGOLDEN VILLAGE (PART)
Shanagolden Demesne
Sroolane
Tiermore
Tideway of R.Shannon
    " " " Fisheries

BARONY OF GLENQUIN

Comprising the Unions of Kanturk, Newcastle and Rathkeale, 1852.
 
PARISH TOWNLAND
ABBEYFEALE
Abbeyfeale E
Abbeyfeale W
TOWN OF ABBEYTEALE
    " " " Main street
    " " " New Chapel St
    " " " Old Chapel St
    " " " Off Old Chapel Street
    " " " Bridge Street
    " " " or Tralee Rd
Ballaghbehy
Ballaghbehy N
Ballaghbehy S
Caher (Connell)
Caher (Hayes)
Caher (Lane)
Crags
Dromtrasna (Collins)
Dromtrasna (Hartnett)
Dromtrasna N
Dromtrasna S
Kilkinlea Lower
Kilkinlea Upper
Knockbrack
Knocknasnaa
Port
ARDAGH
Killaghteen
CLONELTY
Aughalin
Ballybrown
Ballynoe
Kilgolban
Kiltanna
Knockaderry
VILLAGE OF KNOCKADERRY
Lissaniska E
Lissaniska W
Rathfreedy
GRANGE
Arddrine
Ballingowan
Ballyfraley
Ballymorrisheen
Carrowgar
Cloonyscrehane
Dromin
Dungeeha
Evegallahoo
Gortboy
Gortroe
Grange Lower
Grange Upper
Moveedy
KILLAGHOLEHANE
Barnagarrane
Boola
Farrihy
VIL1AGE OF BROADFORD (PART)
Knockglass
Knock toosh
Lacka Lower
Lacka Upper
Springfield
Tullaha
VILLAGE OF BROADFORD (PART)
KILLEEDY
Acres
Ballagh
Ballintober E
Ballintober S
Ballintober W
Ballyduhig
Ballykenny
Ballylanigan
Ballyowen
Ballyshane
Banemore
Caherlevoy
Camas
Cantogher
Cleanglass N
Cleanglass S
Clooncon
Cloonsherick
Coolaleen
Darrery
Glebe
Glengort N
Glengort S
Glenmore E
Glenmore W
Glenquin
Gorteen
Gortnaclohy
Gortnaskehy
Hernsbrook
Kilcoorha
Killaculleen
Killeedy N
Killeedy S
Killeen
Knockoolkeare
Knocknadiha
Lisnafulla
Mauricetown
Moanroebeg
Moanroemore
Mountcollins
Rahanagh
Raheenagh
Reanagillee Commons
Seeconglas
Tooreennagreana
Toornafulla
MAHOONAGH
Ahawilk
Appletown
Balliniska
Ballinvullin
Ballydonnell
Ballydoorty
Ballygulleen
Ballynakillbeg
Ballynakillmore
Ballynoe
Ballyregan
Clooncooravane N
Clooncooravane S
Cloonmore
Cloonsherick
Cooliska
Coolygorman
Coolyroe
Curragh
Danganbeg
Fawnlehane
Feohanagh
VILLAGE OF FEOHNAGH
Garbally
Garrane
Garryduff
Gorteen
Gortmore
Gortskagh
Inishkeen
Killaready
Mahoonaghbeg
Mahoonamore
VILLAGE OF MAHOONAGH
Mayne
Moanleana
Rathpalatine
Shanrath
Walshestown
Monagay
Ardnacrohy
Arranagh
Ballintubbrid
Ballinvallig
Ballycluvane
Ballygeel
Ballylinane
Ballymackesy
Ballymurragh E
Ballymurragh W
Ballymahown
Ballyquirk
Camas
Clooncon
Cloonyscrehane
Coolnanoglagh
Crean
Cullanagh
Doonakenna
Dromdeeveen
Dromroe
Gardenfield
Garryduff
Glebe
Glendarragh
Glenduff
Glenmore
Glenquin
Glenquin S.
Gorteenreynard
Gortyknaveen
Killeline
Knockane
Townland of Newcastle
Boherbuie W.Side
Convent Ground
Government Street
Houses in rere of
Kockawn Road
Knockawn Road
Lissurlane
Meenyline N
Meenyline S
Montplummer
Rathcahill E
Rathcahill W
Rathnaneane
Townland of Newcastle (Pt.)
Boherbuie
Shangarry
Sugarhill
Tiermeena
Templeglantan E
Templeglantan W
Treanboy
Tulligolline N
Tulligolline S
NEWCASTLE
Ashgrove
Ballinena
Ballylahiff
Ballypierce
Castle Demesne
Churchtown
VILLAGE OF CHURCHTOWN
Dooally
Doocatteen
Dromin (Beesom)
Dromin (Macturlogh)
Dugganville Lower
Dugganville Upper
Dungeeha
Garranekeevan
Glenastar
Glennagowan
Gortboy
Town of Newcastle (part)
Gortnaclough

 

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Reviews

 

From Ancestor, quarterly journal of the  Genealogical  Society of Victoria Vol 25 No 7 September 2001

 

WEST LIMERICK FAMILIES ABROAD

 

by Kate Press and Valerie Thompson. Published by Kate Press, Melbourne, 2001. ISBN 0 646 41334 1.  217 pages plus appendices. Available from GSV Bookshop, price AUS$31.90.

This book extends the work of Dr Chris O'Mahony and Valerie Thompson in Poverty to Promise in examining migration from the region of West Limerick. However the emigration period covered here extends to the end of the 19th century and includes migration to Australia, New Zealand, Canada, United States and Britain, although Australian families form the majority of those studied.

In the introduction the authors give a general overview of Irish history, explaining the reasons behind forced and voluntary migration. Extensive endnotes to the introduction and Appendix C provide many references for further research.

The book is clearly set out and easy to follow as the authors trace the origins, places of settlement and interrelationships of a myriad of West Limerick families. Chain migration and the interconnections between families, both in Ireland and in their new homelands, are well documented. In most cases the authors give details of the first known ancestors, the emigrants and the first generation born abroad, providing good links for family historians to follow.

There are ten appendices, including indexes of Civil and Catholic parishes and an interesting extract from An Enquiry into the Occupation of Land in Ireland in 1844. The surname index includes cross references, and a list of contributors/ family researchers is provided. An interesting addition, if space had permitted, would have been an index of places of settlement, showing the patterns of cluster migration.

Reviewer Maureen Doyle

 

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Irish Roots Issue No. 39 2001 3rd quarter published Cork, Ireland

 

The Lure of Limerick

 

In 1853 as the parents of Mary Barrett of Shanagolden, County Limerick had both died, she took advantage of sponsorship offered by local landlord, Lord Monteagle to travel to Victoria, Australia on the Monteagle. She soon was employed by Mrs Hollis of South Bourke Street, Melbourne for 25 a year plus rations. Like many other Irish settlers, out of her wages Mary remitted 6 to Ireland to assist with the fares of her siblings Bridget, Ellen, Catherine, Michael and John. Other relatives, Catherine and Mary Corbett, also made the long journey. Lord Monteagle advanced the remaining sum needed for their deposits while Lady Monteagle used her influence to ensure that the family travelled together at a time when, due to the gold rushes, assisted immigration for single males into Victoria was not generally permitted. After arriving in Geelong on the Chandenagore on 21 June 1854, Mary's family went to Collingwood to join their sister.

Mary Barrett's story came to light in documents associated with the 'Monteagle emigrants'. These were Australian-Irish who had previously lived within the influence of a local parliamentary member for Limerick (and later, Cambridge), Thomas Spring Rice and his family around his estate at Mount Trenchard overlooking the Shannon Estuary. (This is the same man who during his term as Secretary of State for the Colonies applied for leave to bring in a bill to establish criminal courts on Norfolk Island in the 1830s.) The history of this migration between 1838 and 1858, was told in a 1994 book, Poverty to Promise, written by Limerick researcher, Dr Christopher O'Mahony and Australian social historian, Valerie Thompson.

Following the success of this volume which identified about 736 of the settlers, Valerie Thompson now has joined forces with Kate Press of Melbourne to broaden the study to include West Limerick people who left the area up to the end of the nineteenth century including those seeking homes in places other than the two largest Australian colonies. The new quarto sized book, West Limerick Families Abroad, is most comprehensive, offering ready identification of over 1,000 family names, showing not only their Irish origins but also their issue in the new countries of residence.

Quite apart from the 214 pages allocated to West Limerick families' biographies, several appendices supplement the text contributing prolific references for anyone researching this particular county. A chronology of Irish history is augmented by a time-line for appropriate records before a more detailed listing of local sources ranging from census, histories, journals and directories, to gravestone inscriptions and graveyard records. Valuable schedules including the Limerick newspapers with their dates of publication as well as parish structures -covering the Roman Catholic, civil, and Church of Ireland equivalents and dates - appear in alphabetical groupings under both civil and Roman Catholic headings. Further amplification is offered by the reproduction of the section dealing with the Monteagle property in the 1844 Enquiry into the Occupation of Land in Ireland in addition to the inclusion of numerous Limerick entries that appeared in The Search for Missing Friends Irish immigrant advertisements placed in the Boston Pilot, published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society in Boston, Massachusetts. Following a section on faction fighters and a couple of entries on convicts, the List of Contributors provides contact details for genealogists eager to link families. This well illustrated volume, of which only 1,000 copies were printed, is an essential reference book for libraries and society collections.

Added 1 January 2012-

West Limerick Families Abroad, by Kate Press and Valerie Thompson, Melbourne, 2001 is still available from Tony Press, 71 Claremont Avenue,  Malvern, Victoria, 3144 for A$28.95 plus postage and packing (within Australia) of A$15.00.

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The Irish Times Saturday, August 25, 2001

 

Australians bring diaspora back to roots

 

 

Details of 1,000 families who emigrated from west Limerick over a 200 year period have been compiled by two Australian genealogists. The authors, Kate Press and Valerie Thompson, were assisted by 245 contributors from Australia, New Zealand, the US, South Africa and Co Limerick. The newly-published book, West Limerick Families Abroad, is "the tip of the iceberg," said Ms Press.

A teacher of Irish family history for the Council of Adult Education in Melbourne, Ms Press said "We have covered a lot of families, but thousands more left there." The problem was "some people walk very quietly over the land". Often the descendants did not even know what county their ancestors came from.

"There is a lot of information about the ones involved in public life or out here because they were convicted. But a lot of people came as free settlers. If they paid for their own passage and were free settlers, they could just disappear into obscurity," she said.

The project came about as a follow-up to Poverty to Promise, a book by Ms Thompson, who lives in Sydney, and Dr Christopher O'Mahony, a former Limerick archivist. It concerns the emigrants who left the Monteagle estate in Co Limerick between 1838 and 1858.
"We just found there were so many people who spoke to us after that book was published and wanted more information and wanted it expanded," Ms Press said.

She is a former editor and desktop publisher for the Australian Institute of Genealogical Studies. She said that already there had been people requesting a further work, expanding the genealogical study into the surrounding counties.

"There are so many Clare people in Australia. Most of the early Irish emigrants here are from Munster. The biggest number of Irish emigrants in Australia came from Tipperary," she added. When families broke up, some mUS

embers chose the US or Canada while others emigrated to Australia. Ms Press herself is descended from the Sheehys and Shines, who came from the Shanagolden area of west Limerick, while one of their members went to Canada. "Most Australians, if they look far enough, will find they have American or Canadian or New Zealand cousins."

The Internet has revolutionised the study of genealogy, which is the third most popular hobby in the US. "There are so many links being made and so much material being put on the Internet."

Added 1 January 2012 -

West Limerick Families Abroad is still available from Tony Press in Melbourne (see above). Its index and other details are on www.alphalink.com.au/datatree/westlim

 

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The Deserted Villages

or  how place names have just fallen off the map

by Patrick G. Coleman

This story first appeared in 1989 in Deel Views, a local newsletter. 

Centuries have passed since Goldsmith wrote The Deserted Village and this poem illustrates that the deserted village is not a new phenomenon on the Irish landscape. However, before trying to identify the older variety of deserted village in this article, I will focus initially on those deserted villages left in the wake of the great Famine.

Ireland is fortunate in one respect that the British, for their own military ends, chose to map the island in the late 1830s and early 1840s. The subsequent maps which were produced the 6" copies of the Ordnance Survey maps are not only among the earliest of their type produced anywhere in the world, they also provide a detailed record of the Irish landscape at that time. The maps were accompanied by a series of name-books which record every site of note which appears on the maps. Furthermore, the cartographers and their assistants frequently wrote to headquarters at the Phoenix Park in Dublin, recording any differences they had experienced in the course of their exercise and frequently seeking advice. It is possible to find both copies of the maps and name-books for County Limerick at the County Library. The letters still remain in the Phoenix Park.

In 1840 Rathkeale was a major landlord town, along with being the County town of Limerick. It had a population of almost 5,000 people (compared with 1,800 today). Furthermore, ringed around Rathkeale were a series of small villages, some of which have since disappeared. These villages included the Palatine Chapel of Reens, clachans at Cappellagh (Riddlestown) and Loughill along with Croagh and Cappagh. Today, only Croagh and possibly Ballingarrane and Reens can be said to remain.

To actually put tags on the villages is misleading as within specific groups a great variety existed in their actual layout. This was particularly true of the three Palatine villages. The one feature all three had in common was the Methodist Meeting House. As regards their layout, this differed quite considerably. Courtmatrix was extremely well planned. It consisted of a square of houses laid out around a green with the Meeting House at the centre. This was the earliest of the Palatine villages to be settled in the locality (indeed in Ireland). Its layout indicates that Southwell was prepared to spend money to attract the community onto his estate. According to Mayes, each settler got 8 acres with the joint use of the commons. The Courtmatrix Commons are still used by local farmers.

At Killiheen the village was linear in shape with the Meeting House at the southern end of the village. Roughly half way between these two villages was a school built by Lady Butler for the education of the children of the two communities. Ballingarrane village, which lies to the north of Rathkeale, was far more dispersed. The Palatines appear to have had their houses spread along 1.5 miles of roadside. However, roughly halfway along this roadway stood the Meeting House and school. In this case the school expenses were paid for by Lord Southwell, whose family was at this stage Catholic (the Southwells were among the first Irish landlords to become Catholic with the ending of the Penal laws).

An interesting aspect of these settlements is that, during the 1820s, the Palatines were subject to sectarian attacks. While I am unaware of any such attacks on those villages around Rathkeale in the 1820s, during the 1780s some three hundred Whiteboys were to surround Ballingarrane and to relieve the inhabitants of their guns. There were no injuries in this incident. Also of interest regarding the later outbreak of violence, the Police Inspector Willcox, who succeeded the assassinated Going, was to testify that his first duty as the Inspector for the Rathkeale area was to purge the police force of Orangemen. Certainly the reduction in violence, following Willcox assuming command, indicates that the police may well have been the agents of provocation in this outbreak of violence. The survival of the Palatine villages at this date suggests that earlier resentment had receded.

It could be said that the Turnpike village of Reens survives today with its pubs and its sub-post office providing services for the surrounding countryside. It would be interesting to find out how long the two pubs have been located at this site. The fact that a village existed here is evident on the map. The name-book merely indicates the presence of a small village. The book does indicate, however, that the turnpike was situated on the main Rathkeale - Listowel Road which was still then under construction.

The third set of villages were clachans. These were little farming villages that grew up due to population pressure and the attempts by families to support each other and prevent the landlord from evicting the more vulnerable members. Often these villages could be said to represent a primitive form of cooperative, with everyone helping everyone else. While I know little of either of these two settlements, I do know that the buildings at Cappellagh can still be seen on later maps, such as the 1921 edition of the 6" maps. Tentative enquiries have revealed that it was only relatively recently that the ruins of this village were cleared. Fittingly, these ruins were on the land of Mr. Willie Mulcahy of Riddlestown, as most of the people who were settled in this village bore the Mulcahy name, though there were also some Magners. This suggests that at least one member of the Mulcahy family survived the landlords. I know nothing of the Loughill settlement.

The settlements at Croagh and Cappagh both would appear to have their origins in church related functions. In Croagh there is still very much evidence as the ruins of the old ecclesiastical settlement still dominate the village. By 1840 the village contained `40 huts' according to Lewis. Croagh's inhabitants were to endure a particularly rough time during the famine, yet the village was to survive. Today the village faces another major struggle with the building of the bypass a bypass which may yet provide the kiss of death for the village.

Patrick J. O'Connor in his book Exploring Limerick's Past gives a list of the occupations of the people of Cappagh from the Ordnance Survey name-book. There were a number of traders in the village, servicing the surrounding rural community and yet, of all the villages, Cappagh is the one which was clearly devastated by the famine. The 1851 Census clearly indicates the village was swept away during those hungry years. However, the Civil Survey does make a reference to a Cappaghtowne. As the parish belonged to the Bishop of Limerick, it had obviously developed under Church patronage. One further factor of note about the village in 1841 was the presence of eight Constabulary Officers which suggests the troubles around the area in the 1820s, culminating in the shooting of Captain Going.

Of the earlier deserted villages perhaps the most significant was that of Castlematrix. Castlematrix or Castle Mattress gets its name from the original Lords of Rathkeale. The Manor of Rathkeale was centred on the townlands of Castlematrix and Courtmatrix. Interestingly both townlands were the centre of earlier settlements. Castlematrix is recorded in the 1640s as containing a small village along with a mill. However, the inhabitants of the village were probably cleared at a later date by a member of the Southwell family, and probably these people were to be the original inhabitants of Church Street, the only street in Rathkeale to be part of the Southwell estate. The remainder of the town had the Abbey as the focus of its development. This is clear from the Peyton Survey of 1588, which shows the lands of the Abbey to be the centre for the annual market and records the presence of buildings which could be rented as `shops' in this area. The Civil Survey in 1654 and the 1659 Census provide us with a picture of a town stretching from the Abbey towards the Deel Bridge, containing over 600 inhabitants, where most of the property owners were old English. This implies that, contrary to McCarthy-Murrough's opinion, Rathkeale was not in fact a plantation town but had much older roots and far more substantial than people thought (Kilmallock about this time with possibly 3,000 inhabitants was almost certainly the largest inland town in the county and among the five largest in the country as a whole). Rathkeale would have been second only to Kilmallock in Co. Limerick.

There also appears to have been an earlier settlement at Courtmatrix where, during the Irish rebellion of 1641, the Southwell papers record that fifteen houses at Courtmatrix had been burned. This site (probably the site of an English village) was superseded by the later Palatine settlement. Today, in an attempt to trace evidence of deserted villages from this era, historians are using two methods. Firstly, there is aerial photography, which gives a clearer view of ruins from the air than exists on the ground. There is also the 1659 Census. In the case of Rathkeale parish, apart from giving knowledge of the existence of Ballyalinan village which has long been known, the Census also suggests the existence of a village at Ballyea of which no reference or evidence previously existed.

Other villages certainly existed at Nantenan near the Fair Green on the edge of the Royse Estate and Cloghnarold House. Again the village is suggested in the correspondence of the Southwells but is also supported by the presence of the ruins of an old church close to the house. The house was built on the side of an old castle. This practice was quite common in Ireland and in the neighbourhood of Rathkeale the most noticeable example appears to be Mount Southwell which, it has been suggested, was built on the site of Rathkeale Castle. If this is true, one should also be aware of the fact that the Rath (Fort) of Caola, from which Rathkeale gets its name, is situated near the Shrine. This suggests continuous settlement at the western end of town for at least one thousand years and is supported by the finding in the last century of a bracelet on an ecclesiastical site in Rathkeale, though this church was never identified. The bracelet was believed to have dated from the Bronze Age but recently this has been dated to the Viking period.

This article has sought to identify the rich artefacts on the landscape around Rathkeale and, in so doing, throw some light on the history of Rathkeale town. As can be seen, the town has in past periods been the centre of prosperous rural communities. The fact that these villages went into decline is usually linked with periods of crisis in Irish history. Thus villages like Ballyalinan, Cloghnarold and Ballyea (if indeed there was a village there) almost certainly went into decline in the wake of the Cromwell era. Later, villages such as Courtmatrix, Cappagh, Nantenan and Killiheen owe their decline to emigration in the wake of the Famine, if not the Famine itself.

However, another aspect of local history which has had little attention paid to it is the extent to which outside groups settled in the vicinity of Rathkeale. Most Irish parishes had to integrate English and Anglo-Norman settlers, however small these settlements. Rathkeale not only integrated these groups, but also the Palatine community and a Scottish settlement. The Scottish settlement was based in Ballyalinan and was introduced by the Earl of Desmond. They belonged to the MacSheehy clan and were settled as Gallowglass (members of Desmond's army). This tradition of integrating outside communities makes Rathkeale a unique example of a melting pot in Irish history. It continues today to have a large number of travellers who choose to make Rathkeale their permanent residence. In the past, local landlords helped integrate these groups into our community. If the travellers are to be integrated into Rathkeale, then a future has also to be guaranteed for the settled community. It is the time for a new benefactor to help in this process, namely the Irish Government, otherwise one fears that the long-term future of the town itself will be in question.

A set of early photographs of Rathkeale are available from the National Library in Ireland.

 

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Last Updated on 7 February  2012